Four Suggestions For Dealing With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Four Suggestions For Dealing With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is one of those illnesses that its effects aren’t truly appreciated by people who do not suffer from it. I have heard more than once “what, you are tired again? You already slept so much!”. It doesn’t help to remind that I suffer from a condition and I’m not just being lazy.

The fact is, suffering from this condition and still leading an ordinary life requires changes to one’s routine. Moreover, at times this might even be impossible. The following suggestions may help.

Avoid pushing myself. One of the things that makes me particularly tired – and I know it is a known factor – is exercise. At times even mild exercise can really have a serious effect. In this case, as well as other aspects that cause my condition to worsen, I simply factor that into my routine and expect being tired. By doing so at least I am prepared and can avoid my plans from being disrupted.

Live in a central location. This might not be possible for everyone, particularly if you own the place you live in, but if you rent an apartment or a house, it might be worthwhile to live close to where your main activities take place even if it means sacrificing some things. Not only this prevents wasting valuable time on commute but it also conserves energy. My own example: a while ago I made the mistake of renting an apartment which was about 15 minutes from the train station. These 30 extra minutes of walking every day have had a much more pronounced effect on me than they should’ve… but that’s how it is. I now know that it is better for me to live in a smaller and more cramped place but at least know I have more time and energy every day to do what I need.

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Be efficient. This is easier said than done, particularly for a procrastinator like myself, but I’ve learned that when I have energy – I should use it. It is very frustrating to spend time doing nothing of value, only to finally begin my chores and feel myself falling asleep or have brain fog emerge.

Taking naps. At times during the middle of the day I feel tired and/or brain fog sets in. I find that an hour or two can really – at least temporarily – alleviate these symptoms. It’s not a cure, but it helps. I’m not sure this will affect everyone the same way, but at least in my case it does.